Papercuts

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Bluefat Archive June 2009

Papercuts' Memory Is a Smudgy Window

"It feels honest. It's not a put-on. It's very scary."


When you are lost in a haze of ennui, confusion, alienation, yearning лл or you crave these sensations лл you could do far worse than immerse yourself in Papercuts' You Can Have What You Want (Gnomonsong). It's a very lonely experience, but a cathartic one, as lonely experiences often are.


The young man who created this music is Jason Quever. For reasons known only to him, he's made a mesmerizing sort of pop, the kind that's good for reverie: beautiful, not in a saccharine way, but in a vibrating, memory-triggering way. You Can Have What You Want, his second full-length following 2007's Can't Go Back, is a moving string of tunes that miraculously melt down the minor-key daydreams of '60s and '70s British and American rock while inventing a sound for emotions that feel familiar yet...not quite.


It's easy to project a lot on the maker of music like this, imagining a stew pot of trauma that would've irretrievably colored his POV a deep, dusty rose. As a youth, Quever grew up in and around Humboldt County in northern California, then he moved to San Jose. Then he lost his parents.


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